Dyson Hand Dryer AB01 and AB03 Filters.

So you want to buy a Dyson Airblade filter?

At last you can buy a Dyson Airblade filter online.

The difference is that you can buy these without serial numbers, registration, or anyone trying to up-sell you into a new hand dryer.

Better still, you don’t have to call anyone begging for them as you did before with Dyson. You can buy them painlessly online and get one or more delivered anywhere in the world.

Problem solved. thumbs

Oh, you want to know where from?

Get them here: Buy Dyson Airblade Hand Dryer Filters.

Does Mental Decay Start in Your 40’s?

Funny tale [well, I thought so anyway].

Years ago, I used to have a Merc van business [sales, service, repair, dismantling – the usual]. We closed it in 98 and moved on to other things. Since then we moved into Dyson vacuums. Identical business model in many respects [dismantling, parts, sales, service, repair], but smaller, lighter things one can work on indoors, by the fire, and use screwdrivers with instead of working outdoors using air tools in January [we are all in our 40’s now after all – all that spanner work at -5c should be long gone].

My top tech from the Merc job [who has been with me forever] came with me and years later he is now a Dyson guru. (He was a Mercedes guru before) All well and good up to now.

So recently we repaired a Dyson for a local van breakers. Our Merc Sprinter van needed an exhaust, so we fixed his Dyson and he gave us an “as new” exhaust for our van. Happy days. Mr. Green

The Sprinter exhaust isn’t held on by very much (after the downpipe – which doesn’t tend to rust), two bolts and some hanging rubbers. So rather than send it out to a garage, and as my top bloke once was that good he swapped a T1 Merc 308D engine in forty minutes (incentivised by a big bonus to get the van back on the road, and with air tools and a helper I might add), why should we send the van out to a garage and pay a bloke forty or fifty quid?

We had a slack afternoon yesterday, We had a socket set, so I suggested he might like to don the white gloves, and rekindle his Mercedes skills of olde and pop the new exhaust on. We parked the van on a nearby high kerb and off he went. I’d be surprised if it took more than 40 minutes.

He did mumble it had been ten years since he had laid a spanner on a Merc van, but it has been longer for me, but I still managed to do two running repairs in the last year on trips (out of necessity), one in the forests of south Estonia, and one recently in France (its never close to home). Both injector leak off pipes (always the back ones isn’t it?) – I since changed them all last weekend.

First he is complaining the sump cover wont come off to access the exhaust flange. Much chiselling and swearing ensued, and in the end a bolt sheared off. OK, it happens….

Next onto the exhaust bolts. The bottom one comes off with much creaking and much effort. The top one ended up sheared off, snapped bolt in a captive thread on the flange. Crying or Very sad

Knowing the bolt hadn’t been out for over a decade, a sensible person might have warmed it up, dowsed it in some WD40 or Plusgas, turned it a quarter turn tighter before carefully removing it. We used to dismantle very old vans. He knows this stuff.

No.

My chap stuck a half inch socket drive on it, a foot long ratchet, and swung on it like his life depended on it. Then *snap*. Big Cry

So we are left with me with a van with a sump guard hanging off, sheared off exhaust bolts and an exhaust that growls like a bear. All done by a guy who was once the toast of the MB Club forums as a mega tech guru.

I said, “You have lost your Merc mojo haven’t you?”

He said, “I think I have. Give me a Dyson DC41 and a voltmeter now – I can fix those with my eyes closed” Rolling with laughter

So I trundled off to a local garage that does all my MOT’s (and did when I was in the trade too), told him the problem, he said “take that ramp, the toolbox is there, help yourself” (it was in the 90’s I last did that there!).

Ten minutes later, I had it up on the ramp, the old exhaust off, but was struggling to get the seized in stud out. At that point, I realised that I had probably lost my mojo too, I asked for help, a guy came along with a new fangled stud extractor (of a type I had never seen or used), he had it out in moments, two new bolts arrived, new exhaust was offered up, rubbers on, bolted up, and the new exhaust was in situ moments later. A self tapping bolt into a drilled hole took the place of the sheared off one on the sump guard. Nice and easy.

I offered him money, he shrugged and said it didn’t matter as I am an old trade customer who sends him punters, and he does all our tests there, and this was my own van – so free. When pushed, he said a tenner. I gave him twenty to be polite. I’d like to give him a shout here in case anyone is local. TAW Garage in Gorton, Manchester. They are not kitted up to do involved stuff with RRS, but for general stuff and tests, they are capable, honest and fair priced.

So I decided I have probably lost my mojo too. Laughing

How is it possible that two guys who used to be Merc gurus in the 90’s cant even fit an exhaust on a Sprinter van today without help from adults? Rolling with laughter

Like riding a bike some say. I say not. We used to do petrol to diesel conversions on T1 vans and 123/4 Mercs. Some of that took some proper thinking about, much rewiring, and electrical vacuum valve conversions to make the ignition shut off work correctly. We used to do power steering conversions and overnight engine swaps on vans that had to be at market at 6am the next day. Front axle swap? With a fork lift truck and air tools it was 30 minutes – watch this space……..

Do we lose it if we don’t use it? I am still mid 40’s so not for the funny farm just yet. I can now write html in notepad now that I couldn’t do then. I have forgot more about Dysons than Mr Dyson probably ever knew. But I seem to have forgotten much of what I spent a decade learning about Mercedes. Is that normal?

How Dyson Tries to Control the After-Market – The Future of Refurbished Dysons

This is from a Dyson dealer in a member-only forum in the Dyson trade business:

I think the window of opportunity for large scale refurbing of machines is coming to an end. I’ll explain why I think that and we’ll maybe discuss.

When James Dyson had the reigns of the company instead of Max Conze and the bean counters as we have now, they made good products that lasted. Great for consumers and folks like us who refurb stuff, but bad for the long term growth of Dyson.

I call it the Volvo effect: Remember the Volvo 240, the 740 and the 940? Proper things; albeit facelifted versions of the same things. Built like tanks, cheap and easy to fix and lasted for years. Those cars were so good that Volvo went skint and started rebadging French cars along the way down to ownership by Ford, etc. Because repeat custom was low as the product was too good.

Why would you sell someone a product and not see that buyer again for fifteen years, when you could sell them a product that has built in natural short term expiry, beyond which it is an uneconomical repair? That way you see the customer again right after the guarantee runs out.

In reality, Dyson was a one trick Pony. The DC01 was OK, but the DC04 was really the one that made the company. But, for example, my Dad still has one of the very first DC04’s we imported brand new in the late 90’s. As do literally hundreds of thousands of other people.

The DC07, a DC04 with a different cyclone. A facelift.

The DC14, a revamped DC04.

The DC27 has a carriage design fault that nobody seems to be able to figure out how to fix.
The DC33, a shoddier, cheaper built, facelifted DC14. Pretty much a DC04 under the skin.

And at the DC33, they killed the model that made the company. That design is now dead. It was still too good.

Along the way we had the over-complicated and expensive to repair DC15 and DC18. The future!

What we have since is facelifts and evolution of the DC18. Each one more complicated, with more to go wrong, and inbuilt design flaws and intended short life components.

Balls are built to blow up or fall to bits at the end of the guarantee period. Many do so well before then. Early expiry by design.

If they learn by the mistakes of making the parts and tools fit all models, which they have, they can minimise the impact of the aftermarket on parts prices by making everything that little bit different along the way so parts are not interchangeable (DC18 and DC25 cyclones are early evidence of this – same item, bar one tweak which stops one working on the other).

Fast forward to today, and we have the DC41, discussed here. A machine so overly complicated to take apart, with parts so expensive, and design so awful that core units will be in no condition to refurbish in the future. Even the ducts were falling apart on the “clean ones” we got. We had to glue them up and make some pretty shoddy chemical metal repairs here and there I wasn’t really happy with. They have the inbuilt design fault that renders most in need of a new cleaner head (shitty wheel causing glueing to the floor and Johnson brushroll motor from the DC25).

DC41’s we here will see in two or three years will be in no condition to refurbish without practically renewing the machine. Who does hand-helds? Also crap and no small parts available for.

This means our window of opportunity has expired on new models. Dyson have closed the door (as they have tried to do on Airblades – but thats another story)

This leaves the refurbers window of opportunity the DC04, DC07, DC14 and DC33. To a lesser extent we might add the DC24 and DC25 (both riddled with design faults but just doable).

We are seeing some DC04 stuff going obsolete the last few weeks, soon they will pull support as they did with the DC01. Why the DC01 is almost gone.

We will be left with the 7, 14 and 33 as easy to do machines with plentiful parts. Followed up by the 24 and 25. When they get older? Job done.

Aggressive “trade in” deals is causing over supply in the core machine market. We was reaching out for machines a year ago. This week we turned down 120, and that is after moving along about a hundred into the trade recently “as is”. That wont last long, just long enough to pull a few hundred thousand more older machines out of the market to overwhelm the aftermarket and create export to the developing world, which is already happening – we already exported some machines this way.

Export en masse of core units is good for a manufacturer – it empties the main marketplace (where the profit is) of old products people can recycle. When did you last see a Volvo 940 or a Mercedes 307D/308D/310D T1 van?

You didnt because they all quietly vanished on boats to Africa. Volvo and Mercedes created export demand – as Dyson are doing. Soon we will see guys buying up old units to send to Africa, India and maybe Russia in container loads (remember when all the Ladas went back to Russia in 97-98?).

I give it five years tops. After which all that will be available is smashed up DC41’s and later models that will be uneconomical and over-complicated to repair leaving no decent profit margin. So the refurbed machine market will die. We’ll all get a good run on DC14’s (aka Volvo 940) now for a while, but when they start to look old hat, the easy days will be behind us.

This has all been planned by Dyson carefully to kill the refurbed machine aftermarket (an unintended consequence of a quality product), and by extension reign in the burgeoning after-market. Every machine any of us sell is a potential lost sale to them how they see it. I don’t agree with that (I think the customers are quite different), but I heard it from the horses mouth: A Dyson staff member. Why they closed our spares account without warning. Explanation? “We don’t support what you do. We don’t support the refurbished product market. We refuse to supply you, and have notified every dealer in Europe not to supply you.” Well, I like to ruffle feathers. I am flattered they noticed us.

Any thoughts or opinions out there?

Disponibilité de Dyson DC01 Pièces de rechange

Retour en 2011 , nous avons ici à Dyson Medic signalé sur le de DC01 Pièces .

Nous avons souligné que Dyson a tiré la prise sur toutes les pièces de rechange d’approvisionnement pour le DC01 et DC02 tout à fait, et même, dans certains pays , nous savons qu’ils ont envoyé ce qui restait des pièces de rechange pour les fins de destruction à des entreprises spécialisées.

La question Dyson face était semblable à ce que Volvo avait une fois : Certains modèles ont été conçus si bien que les propriétaires étaient enclins à avoir tout simplement faire réparer pendant de nombreuses années . Ainsi, le moyen de tuer les anciens est de cesser fourniture de pièces détachées et ils meurent lentement.

L’idée de marketing derrière cela est que les gens vont alors se précipiter et acheter un nouveau modèle Dyson balle , mais nous ne pensons pas que beaucoup d’entre eux font réellement . Ce que beaucoup vont faire après un DC01 suffisamment performant pour plus de quinze ans est évitent une nouvelle machine à plus de €300 au lieu d’acheter un reconditionné Dyson pour moins de la moitié .

Mais les amateurs de bricolage , et certainement les collectionneurs , voudront continuer à réparer leurs fidèles vieux DC01 de .

Dyson Medic Names Manchester Vacs Recommended Dyson Spare Parts Retailer

Manchester, England (PRWEB) May 11, 2013

The specialist Dyson vacuum cleaner spare parts specialists http://manchestervacs.co.uk have re-launched their online spare parts store.

Already the largest independent retail Dyson spare parts suppliers in the north of England, Manchester Vacs have now extended their product ranges even further. The spares listings now cover every upright model Dyson have produced from the DC01 right up to the DC50, whilst adding spares also for non-UK cylinder models such as the DC29.

The range of Dyson spare parts now supplied by Manchester Vacs far exceed what Dyson themselves make available to the public, and they also offer many spare parts that Dyson refuse to make available even to the trade. You can buy the DC25 brushroll motors from Manchester Vacs that no other UK Dyson spare parts supplier is able to source.

Manchester Vacs continues to innovate and has once more turned the Dyson spares market on its head.

Recycled Dyson spare parts have always been a large part of the Manchester Vacs business model. Despite getting larger over the years, that hasn’t changed. The new online store still features many recycled and reconditioned parts. Customer feedback suggested that people enjoy not only saving money, but also being green at the same time. Recycled parts are a great way to do that. It is claimed that each of us throws away over three tonnes of broken electrical appliances during the course of our lives. Repairing and extending the life of your Dyson is green. It’s a small cog in the large machine that is our future sustainability.

The online store has now opened its doors to the world market making it easier for customers in Australia, the USA and elsewhere to source hard-to-find Dyson spare parts right from the home of Dyson: England. Manchester Vacs will also ship to some countries that many parts suppliers refuse to trade with such as Russia and Ukraine.

“Manchester Vacs supplies Dyson parts that are simply not available anywhere else. They were the first to sell brushroll removal tools in the UK, and they are the first to sell DC25 Johnson brushroll motors and PCB’s. They continue to innovate and turn the Dyson spares market on its head.” wrote Angus Black, the author of the ‘Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual’ and spokesperson for http://dysonmedic.com – the oldest Dyson review site on the internet.

Manchester Vacs also give their site visitors and customers access to a global internet advice forum for Dyson enthusiasts and repairers. Its many hundreds of active members, expert advisors and experienced contributors from the US, Australia, Canada, South Africa and the UK, can advise the DIY repairer free of charge.

The new online Dyson spare parts shop at Manchester Vacs gives customers access to a highly innovative predictive search feature allowing them to find the parts they need with ease. Delivery is free on all UK orders over £25. They have also slashed three hundred prices across the store and now stand as one of the most competitive Dyson spare parts specialists on the internet.

The all new Manchester Vacs Dyson spare parts online shop is now open for business athttp://manchestervacs.co.uk/Dyson

Dyson DC33 Discount Online

Manchester Vacs have done it again! 

In the 1990’s they brought you brand new DC04’s at unbeatable prices. They sold hundreds.

In the naughties they brought you brand new ‘grey imported’ DC15’s at unbeatable prices. They sold hundreds.

In June 2012 they are offering brand new DC33’s at just £199. Yes, £199 including FREE UK mainland delivery.

I spoke to Claire from Manchester Vacs on the telephone today and I got the heads up on this offer that started today! She told me she doesn’t know how long the deal will last, and they don’t know how many they can get, but they are available right now and they are selling like hot cakes!

This is the gold and silver DC33 Multi Floor with HEPA filters.

Dyson DC33 Buy Online

It sells on Dyson’s website for £269.99. >>See here for proof<<

It sells on Amazon from the cheapest seller for £214.09 with delivery. >>See here for proof<<

Manchester Vacs can sell it for £199 including standard courier mainland UK delivery and a two year Dyson guarantee. While stocks last……. so that means be quick! 

You can click the button below to go to the page for the deal.

Discount Dyson DC33

If you see them on that page, they are still available. If you don’t see them on that page, they have all gone and you have missed the boat.

Dyson ‘Special Offer’ Service Telephone Calls are a Scam.

Why do we say to you that cold-calling telephone sales people who want to service your Dyson are a scam?

Well, first of all – they are NOT from Dyson!
When you have the “fly-by-night” cowboys in your home to do a twenty minute Dyson DC07 service, they will not do a proper job.

“Why not?” you may ask. Well, the reason is, that with a Dyson DC07, a professional service involves stripping the cyclone down and cleaning it – preferably with a power washer or a steam cleaner – to restore optimal performance.

You may not know this, because if you have read your Dyson instruction manual you won’t know what needs to be done. If you have read your Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual you will know what needs to be done.

I stripped a Dyson DC07 down a few days ago and it was blocked up in such a way that no “at home” service would be able to fix it. Look at this photo when I took off the cyclone top:

I spent thirty minutes cleaning and power-washing it so it looked like this:

Which is what it is supposed to look like if you expect it to work.

Today, I was reading over the old Dyson Medic site that was written a few years ago, and I was surprised that amongst the motor swap, belt change and filter service guides we wrote back then, that we didn’t discuss cyclone cleaning more.

It was covered very comprehensively in the Dyson DC07 Repair Manual, but not everyone has one of those. Some guys only like “free” download stuff and don’t want to pay for anything. Similarly, we at Dyson Medic sometimes hold a little something back that we will give you in one of our written books.

As Dyson Medic is one of the biggest and most-trusted after-market Dyson brands in the world, we hope you’ll buy something off us one day. If only to learn a few ‘trade secrets’ that we wont publish on our websites. :-)

Anyway, the point of this short article was to implore you not to skimp on a Dyson DC07 service. Do NOT employ people who ‘do it in your home’ as they won’t have the facilities to clean your cyclone properly. Look at the photographs again – those cyclones block up and need cleaning properly!

A warning: Never accept anyone coming to your home to service or repair your Dyson who cold calls you. That is always a scam company who will rip you off!

Read about the Dyson scammers who ‘service in your home’ on the Dyson forums here: Dyson ‘special offer’ telephone calls are a scam.

Just Released Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual Shows DIY Enthusiasts How To Fix Their Dyson Vacuum Cleaner at Home

Aberdeen, Scotland December 06, 2011

The specialist Dyson vacuum cleaner engineer Angus Black has used his own experience – spanning almost thirty years – to create a fully illustrated workshop and service manual for the Dyson DC07 available to all DIY Dyson enthusiasts, while shattering the myths that suggested Dysons were too complicated for the practically-inclined layman to work on.

The specialist Dyson vacuum cleaner engineer Angus Black has used his own experience – spanning almost thirty years – to create a fully illustrated workshop and service manual for the Dyson DC07 available to all DIY Dyson enthusiasts, while shattering the myths that suggested Dysons were too complicated for the practically-inclined layman to work on.

The tongue-in-cheek cover, which features a sexy blonde in a tight white t-shirt, hard hat and torn jeans, standing amongst several Dyson DC07’s, has already caused some controversy among feminist groups and made the book’s sales jump, thanks to the unsought publicity.

“The author has created something which genuinely offers the ‘inside scoop.’ It is an absolute must-read for anyone seeking a DC07 maintenance guide,” wrote David Myers, a technician at Manchester Vacs, an independent Dyson specialist.

The author, Angus Black, shares little-known trade secrets about the Dyson DC07, together with where to source special Dyson trade-only tools. He claims that each of us throws away over three tonnes of broken electrical appliances during the course of our lives. Repairing and extending the life of your Dyson is green. It’s a small cog in the large machine that is our future sustainability.

The book corrects common misperceptions and enlightens people about Dyson DC07 maintenance and repairs. All the most popular repairs are explored with candour and common sense. There are many illustrations throughout the book, and best of all is the comprehensive DC07 motor replacement guide.

The final chapters offer practical advice on sourcing parts and machines. Why parts from eBay might not be as good a deal as you imagine and access to on-line resources like video how-to guides and specialist trade-only Dyson sites.

Black also gives his readers access to a global internet advice forum for Dyson enthusiasts and repairers. Its many hundreds of active members, expert advisors and experienced contributors from the US, Australia, Canada, South Africa and the UK, can advise on any relevant issues that are not covered in the book.

The “Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual – All you need to know to perform any DIY repair to your Dyson DC07” is already being referred to as the “bible” on the Dyson DC07. It is now available from http://www.DysonWorkshopManuals.com and at major bookshops and e-retailers. ISBN 978-0-9556874-1-9
###

The Dyson Vacuum Cleaner Forums Newsletter – Autumn 2011

Hello Dyson Enthusiast,

As a member of the unofficial Dyson Forums, we just wanted to take an opportunity to bring you up to date with a few happenings, a few special offers and a handful of other things that may be of interest to you.

Do you have a Dyson repair shop in the US or Australia? If so, you are welcome to place an informational post about yourself in the “Worldwide Dyson Resources” section. Use where you are in the title. For example: “Jackson’s Dyson Repairs in Idaho.” All we ask in return is that you look around our forums and answer a few questions when you can.

Can you help out our new member Lawrie7062? He has a problem with his DC14. The topic is here: My DC14 “backfiring”.

Those in the UK have likely never have seen a DC04/DC07/DC14 brush roll and belt removal tool. We are the sole UK stockists of these tools. You can see a tutorial and read all about them here: Dyson Belt & Brush Bar Removal Tool (Belt Lifter Tool) Tutorial.

Do you own a DC07? Our member Angus Black has released a Dyson DC07 workshop manual. It is only available in paperback, and you can get one directly from his site here: The Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual.

Do you have a favourite Dyson? Did you vote in our poll? Here is the link: Poll — Which is your favourite Dyson? Vote Now! Up to now, the DC07 is in the lead with 32.5% of votes. If you havent voted already, we want your vote!

And last but not least, we work quite hard to make sure people can find us on Google. But we like to know how you found us originally. Was it a link from another site? Was it from Google? Was it from an email or a recommendation? Tell us. Here is the topic: New Members – How did you find us?

Thanks for reading. You are receiving this newsletter as a member of the Dyson Forums. Don’t worry, you wont be getting three a week; nor will your details be passed to any other organisation or entity. But, we would love to see you as an active partcipant on our forums. Why not drop by and say hello?

Regards,
The Dyson Forum – Dyson Advice – Dyson Discussion Board – Dyson Talk Team.

Dyson DC07 Maintenance Guide – Service Book – Workshop Manual

Are you looking for a Dyson DC07 workshop manual? Until recently, nobody had published a DC07 service book – now they have. The Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual is available only in paperback – there is no “e-book”.

The author, Angus Black, shares his own thirty years of experience repairing vacuum cleaners. He shares little-known trade secrets about the Dyson DC07, together with where to source trade-only tools.

“The author has created something which genuinely offers the ‘inside scoop.’ It is an absolute must-read for anyone seeking a DC07 maintenance guide,” wrote David Myers, a technician at Manchester Vacs, an independent Dyson specialist.

For anyone seeking a DC07 service manual, there is really only one choice.

The book corrects common misperceptions and enlightens people about Dyson DC07 maintenance and repairs. All the most popular repairs are explored with candor and common sense. There are many illustrations throughout the book, and best of all is the comprehensive DC07 motor replacement guide.

UK and American model Dyson DC07’s are catered for, with differences between the models highlighted throughout.

The final chapters offer practical advice on sourcing parts and machines. Why parts from eBay might not be as good a deal as you imagine and access to on-line resources like video how-to guides and specialist Dyson sites.

The Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual is available anywhere in the world direct from this page: Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual


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